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Panama Retirement: Not for me

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Written by Matt   
Monday, 10 May 2010 14:04

Someone recently asked me if I would ever retire to Panama and I said, conclusively, that I would not. To serve as preeminent defense, I am aware that “if I don’t want to retire here, I can just go somewhere else.” This is important. But below are also my feelings on what Panama inherently lacks to truly make it an international retirement destination and not just some fly-by-night trend.

This article is a cultural criticism with a difference...you know that I am a member in good standing of the very culture I criticize.

 

When competing with the already-established retirement destinations of the world, there are of course major differences to take into account. Below, I’ve attempted to set apart the ones that would, for me, eliminate Panama from my list of choices.

Rising costs: The original draw to Panama for retirees was that it was inexpensive: that you could hire help and buy food and travel for considerably less than at home, thus improving the overall quality of living. Everything in Panama, with the exception of a few creature comforts, has gone up in price diluting this once-legit selling feature. It would not be uncommon for a retiree here in Panama to spend the same, if not more, on a basket of goods, than would someone in Florida.

Work ethic: You are the company you keep and when I retire, I want to surround myself in some part of the world with prompt and hard working individuals, traits which simply are not engrained in Panamanian culture. Not only is it difficult to get things done relying on a lazy person, but the laziness has a tendency of seeping into you via Panamanian osmosis. I want to get sharper over my retirement years, not more dull.

Food: Good food is an integral part of my life and I could not see myself retiring to anywhere the dining scene or the accessibility to high-end products is anything below spectacular. Innovative chefs, gourmet delivery services, access to new ethnic foods are all lacking in Panama. While it is, comparatively speaking, significantly better than any of the surrounding countries, the food in Panama’s capital (the best the country offers) still leaves a lot to be desired to a true foodie like myself. 

Amenities: If I were to retire tomorrow, I would want to live roughly 1-2 hours outside a cosmopolitan city but I would still ostentatiously demand all the amenities one would expect with comfortable living: gourmet supermarkets, golf courses, airports, hospitals…etc: none of which are really up to speed in Panama’s interior. Granted, development takes time. But for those considering retiring today, the infrastructure isn’t there yet.

Convenience: Panama is inherently an inconvenient country in many ways. When I retire, I don’t want to have to worry about overly-suspicious bank tellers, traffic debacles, non-electronic immigration departments, bad customer service, juega vivo: which is to say, things that cause discomfort and waste my time. The majority of things I do in Panama today are inconvenient and I consider myself a pretty patient and sensible person. In short, when I retire, I don’t want to spend my last days waiting, like we did last night, twenty-five minutes for a BigMac with no ketchup.

Authenticity: For some time, I have been haunted by the contemporariness and the drive for modernity that has emerged in Panama over my experimental time here. I have found myself under the suspicion that the things I’d want in retirement – the comforts, the challenges, the company, and the values – aren’t necessarily a perfect fit for Panama, no matter where in the country I’d choose to live. If I was to overlook all the superficialities, I would search for, above anything else, a sense of authenticity, which is simultaneously something I feel Panama, in its rush for development, is losing on a daily basis.

A common counter-argument, in fact one that I’ve made before, would be to say that the aforementioned challenges are what makes retirement in Panama so…fulfilling. As a young person, I don’t find them harsh enough to turn me away, but that is not to say, however, that when I am older and ready to retire, that I’ll be nearly as forgiving.  

This article is a cultural criticism with a difference. You know full well that I invest, form lifelong relationships, and cherish Panama with a special part of my heart. You also know that I am a member in good standing of the very culture I criticize. I have attempted to explain a trend – retirement to Panama – by digesting what such a move would mean to me.

I would say that I’m not alone in wanting many of these things when I retire. It is a universal longing to desire the genuine and the comfortable, perfection and pleasure. Panama is a tremendous country in so many ways (business, vacation, investment). It’s just that, for me, retirement wouldn’t happen to be one of them.

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Agree...but
written by Happy in the Playa , May 11, 2010
Matt, I consider this a very thoughtful piece. My husband and I have now been retired here for 8 years (a long time considering when we arrived, there were not a lot of people like us). We were a very unique breed back then (and still are today) in that we weren't looking for the creature comforts your article depicts. Instead, we wanted to live quietly and peacefully at the beach: happy to grow our own veggies and catch our own fish. In this regard, Panama was a terrific option for us. This is not to say, however, that many of your comments don't hit a sensitive - albeit accurate - nerve and make me wonder: how much better would our lives be with access to all these virtues and amenities? In all, I think, in general, you are very correct in your outline. There are people, note you, whom don't need that which you explain. But at the same time, a majority of retirees probably do smilies/smiley.gif
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panama retirement not for me
written by Jon Dull , May 11, 2010
Matt, I agree fully with you. I live in Bocas and love Panama, The marine life, bird and plants are a tremendous joy to me. What you mention about the work ethic and customer service and costs of basic necessities is all very accurate. This has to be the worst place in the world for customer service. It is all about the employees and their laziness athan trying to take care of a customer. Maybe that is Bocas because of so many tourists. I think the attitude is another boat load of people will arrive in a few mins. The cost of just basic food items increases every month or two.
I am rethinking if I want to stay in Pma. and I have been coming to Bocas for 10 years and have had a house here. Now I am retired and reconsidering staying here.
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Excellent commentary
written by Donn Warton , May 11, 2010
Great perspective. Except for the Philippines, I have found every place in the world to have some abiding charm. The key, it seems, is to know yourself. My observation is that the majority of ex-pats are less self aware than the general population. I admire this commentary because it breaks down experience into practical categories. In the end, there is no paradise: it is our attitude towards our environment that determines how much fun we have.... anyone interested in Cali, Colombia? Send me a note--donn175@hotmail.com
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You're right
written by royston , May 11, 2010
The customer service here is awful. The people here are slugs with a few exceptions.
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Retirement in Panama? Never, nada, nunca
written by Don Ewert , May 11, 2010
I lived in Panama for two years before recently moving to Medellin Colombia and agree with everything you said. Medellin and Colombia blow Panama out of the water. In fact, there is a migration underway now of expats who are tired of both Costa Rica and Panama and are moving to Medellin. While I wouldn't really recommend Medellin for the retiree couple (most likely to cause a divorce), it is paradise for guys. There are lots of attractive, friendly women, excellent infrastructure, excellent customer service, perfect weather, ultra modern stores, good restaurants, friendly helpful police, the list goes on. In short, Medellin is everything Panama is not. To the gringos still in Panama; if you come to Medellin you will never want to return to Panama.
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written by Kathy , May 11, 2010
I'm afraid you have been gone from the U.S. too long. You will find all of the same problems here. Prices are skyrocketing and going to get worse. Lazy people? There are illegal immigrants working everywhere. They work at the same pace as they do in all latin American countries. You are right about the food. It is better here, but restaurants are getting VERY expensive. Solution...learn to cook
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Dead on
written by Ovd , May 11, 2010
As you so elegantly explain, Panama is not an "aspiring" culture. For those who wish to retire amongst dreamers and go-getters and optimists and motivators, Panama is NOT for you. This is not to say Panama doesn't have some great opportunities on other fronts as you dutifully point out (primarily infrastructure, canal, trade). But when it comes to retirement, there are not a lot of people I know that can really thrive in this sort of environment. At least yet...
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Complain much?
written by DaveDel , May 11, 2010
I think it would be easy for the ignorant to simply say, about this article, "stop complaining." But as a Panamanian and a businessman and (soon to be) retiree, I believe your points are fair and truthful. What is unfair is how Panama has adopted the concept of "world class retirement" -- when people arrive here, they are automatically let down. This, my friend, is unfair for both the retiree and Panama the country itself as it has been branded in an unfair manner. Your quote: "I would search for, above anything else, a sense of authenticity, which is simultaneously something I feel Panama, in its rush for development, is losing on a daily basis" could not resonate more with me. Thank you for sharing and managing to turn a cultural criticism into a thing of objectiveness and learning.
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Veracity
written by degas , May 11, 2010
I have been traveling to Panama for over eight years, on business and tourism purposes and reside in the north eastern US. I feel that your perceptions are very accurate and are corroborated by my own. It is refreshing to hear a opinion from someone who "hasn't drank the KOOL-AID". I have travelled extensively throughout the Central & S.America, & have a number of good friends both Panamanians and Expats living there .The problem in some respects is that Panama (Panama City in particular) wants to be' Miami Beach'. I will be spending more exploratory time in the near future in Ecuador, and Colombia.
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Maybe
written by A Craig , May 11, 2010
It all comes to knowing yourself and what you want.
Is it laziness? or a cultural trait because of the heat.
I have been visiting Panama since 1980 and am not looking to
move there. I don't expect things there to be as they are
here in Canada. Isn't that the fun of living internationally?
Age mellows all.
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I couldn't see myself retiring in Panama either
written by LaMer , May 28, 2010
"the comforts, the challenges, the company, and the values" -- your words hit a cord with me.
You are overlooking here the beautiful, lush natural environment. This is something that many retirees look for and Panama is a green country, after all. But beyond this profound need to regenerate at the " green source", there are so many other needs that older people have. "Challenges", at least the physical and mental ones aren't making the top of the list because our bodies do age after all. We might want intellectual engagement, but we don't want to have mental breakdowns over bad service...and our patience does run out as we age. We will need comfort, for sure, and values that are similar to the ones we hold. As an older North American raised in the culture of hard-work and accountability, you wouldn't stand anything less. I see Panama as a possibility for investors and as a second home for those fed up with long winters. But retirement? Maybe...as a temporary experience for those who haven't yet discovered rural Europe or a nice corner back home.
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Trying rural Europe
written by Christian , June 11, 2010
Im a Panamanian in my 30's who lived in Florida legally for 10 years during my 20's. I was looking for the American Dream, but in th end I decided I would come back to Panama,and give it another try. I was blown away by the rising costs, horrible service,the traffic etc. I totally agree with everything the article says, and that's why I never understood why would Panama be such an attractive retiree destination. The fact is that people have different priorities and some may find that they can live with Panama. The same juega vivo some complain about, others like it. I feel the majority are just passing by and will not stay to long.
At my age I want to surround myself with "prompt hardworking individuals" as the article says, in a way escaping from my own culture.(which is sad)
After three years in Panama, I decided to move to rural Europe. So far so good. I enjoy not hearing the constant noise of car alarms every time it rains, the general feeling of accountability and responsibility, being able to travel within Europe in just a few hours. I don't know what will happen, but I have crossed USA and Panama from my places to live list.
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written by Charles , June 16, 2010
I can understand your position on topics you touched. However, I believe what you are looking for is not achievable in today's world. It would be very difficult to have access to your "wish list" while doing it on a very low budget. You just can't have it both ways. Please let me know if you find such a destination, maybe I would really have to consider such place.
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Many on my website will disagre with you - but not all.
written by Rob Brown , June 18, 2010
My website researches international retirement destinations. Panama has always scored fairly high on all of our reader surveys.
While your article is well written and quite articulate, it is obviously a young persons' - and clearly North American, perspective.
Many on my site will disagree with you, but not all.
I find the AAA personalities find it particularly hard here, and those trying to get business done. Those pursuing personal goals such as the arts, gardening, reading, and other non-commercial personal pursuits seem to be fairing much better than those that need to work here.
Good to have a balance of opinion in any case. My site is http://www.retirementdetectives.com
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Panama just sucks the Zen right out of me!
written by chocolatina , July 02, 2010
I can not agree more! I am a Panamanian that has been living in the US for 25 years and who has traveled extensively to different parts of the world. I see in my own people a lack of ambition, a very poor attitude and questionable work ethics. I am building a house as we speak and it has been nothing but pure headaches and dissapoinments. I hope things start changing as more people retire here but it will take a long time. For those who favor Colombia remember when Colombia was the most dangerous place to be in Latin America? Maybe there is hope for Panama.
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Lemons or Lemonade?
written by Raymond , July 16, 2010
While reading this article, I can understand this persons opinions about Panama, but as an American businessman, I can only see opportunity. When you say Panama has no good food and bad customer service, what you are telling me is that I should open a food joint and train my staff on customer service then my food joint will be at full capacity every hour of the day. Life is all about perspective.
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Raymond
written by Sammy Scroat , August 22, 2010
You are what Panama sucks its lifeblood from. Matt once thought the same, I remember. Everyone else I met thought the same. What you do not realise is that is a culture of hand outs, of another gringo coming along soon (whether that be an individual, a company or a nation).

Rob Brown. Clearly you have not stayed for any length of time in this tinpot country.
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written by Kaleem Cota , October 02, 2010
Everyone had some good things to say here. Yet I believe it was Charles here who reminded us there is always fault and things that will not live up to our standards and over all desires. There's only one Paradise "Heaven". So to complain about one place not offering this or that or because the new domicile didn't make your life retirement alittle sweeter as they promised in their literature is just senseless. In this world we take what we can get good or bad. When I think about all the poor and unemployed people back in USA and Canada. I just thank God that I was fortunate enough to raise a lot of wealth in the last few years to move there. My Grandfather was from Panama. Before he died he told me in the early 1930s a lot of Latin Americans were trying to migrate into the USA in hopes of a big dream. After he slaved on a Army base job working for a US Army base for 40yrs he realized all he really got in USA was tired. Last thing he told me is one day its going to become a Prison here in USA so get out while you still can. Hell I'm even buying back our family land in Panama i. Can't wait to get there. I stayed in the country for long periods before so I know what life is like there and I know many people and have cousins there that Panamanian. I think the best thing to do always in life is just keep yourself secure and keep your options open because what doesn't work for one person may be another persons dream come true. "God Bless!"
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written by Marianela , October 31, 2010
I am a Panamanian who has lived in the States for many years and I plan to return home. I went back home and bought a house in a nice residential area to live in, and a condo to rent. Frankly, I am totally against large number of foreigners moving to Panama. With the large influx of Colombians, Venezuelans, and then American retirees,the result of the real estate boom of cheap properties, Panama is experiencing an overload or meltdown, similar to a mental breakdown.Panama is a Third world country and needs to take care of some of its major problems first, such as: A dismal educational system,crime, traffic jams,a poor transportation system,high unemployment,shortage of houses for low income people and a serious cultural norm(lack of a business culture) that affects and hinders economic development.Panama needs to grow, develop and expand first,before it can invite foreigners to retire or to live.One cannot go there with an attitude that things are supposed to be perfect when we are lookig at a serious Third world country placed in a situation where everyone is looking for somethng or a quick fix by the speed of light. It is not going to happen. Panama needs to cater to the Panamanian pupopulation first, or else my native country could easy return to "militarismo" and "caudillismo", furthermore it is still in the region of Latin America.
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Retired LtCol USA Special Forces
written by Ed Lesesne , November 06, 2010
I have lived in Panama for a total of 38 years now and wouldn't live anywhere else in the world. I have been around the world five times and when I finally retied, Sep. 99, I did a through analysis of all the countries I had visited (lived in) and Panama won hands down. Here are my reasons why ? U.S dollar, close proximity to the U.S. with a 25% discount on my plane tickets, has everything any modern city in the U.S. has, climate agrees with me, two oceans to fish, mountains, beaches and beautifully rain forest, very nice people and excellent health care. I did a two year study on cost comparisons between living in Panama and S.C. on every item I could think of and the results showed I live for one third less here in Panama. Of course if I were Donald Trump or a millionaire I might think like you do, however, I am not but LOVE this country and the people and am completely satisfied even if they are not up to your standards. The great thing is YOU can leave and go somewhere else and leave us contented gringos here to enjoy this wonderful country. God bless and I hope you find your utopia. Ed
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written by Marci , December 05, 2010
Interesting article. Sounds like you are describing central Florida, which is where I live. Service, ambition, work ethic here is pretty non-existant.
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Another expat view
written by susan , December 23, 2010
I am an American who has lived in Australia for the past 12 years and am now looking to leave, why? It is expensive, the people's attitude toward business is characterised locally as "fat, dumb and happy" meaning a total lack of ambition and a "she'll be right" attitude. Customer is totally non existent except in very expensive restaurants. The average home here now costs $550,000 and the average annual income is $60,000. Honestly if you made $60,000 a year I have no idea how you could afford to live here. I agree it depends on the individual and what you are looking for. The joke here is if you want to get rich - marry a foreigner. They all seem to come here start businesses and make a lot of money because the Australians are too lazy to do it.
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Panama & retirement
written by Joe Cronan , January 14, 2011
I agree with Mr. Landau for the most part, for a retiree, Panama services are just not there yet. Being borned and raise in the U.S./Panama Canal Zone was beautiful. The "Old Panama Culture" in those days (late 1960's early 1970's) was something to behold. Not to say that culture still doesn't exist, it still does. Our C.H.S. Class of 1970 had a blast while celebrating our 40th classs reunion in Panama, boat ride to Toboga, Diablo rojo party bus ride thru the city and Causeway, hanging at the country Inn/suites in Amador, El Valle tour & Zip line ride, Santa Clara Beach, Playa blanco Beach, Canal lock tour, train ride, tour Colon, & old U.S Canal zone
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If not Panama, then where?
written by Andrea Gonzales , February 05, 2011
My husband and I have been considering Panama for the past three or four years and have made several visits. I do agree with many of the things you discuss. I am wondering, though...if you won't retire in Panama do you know where you will? Or at least a shortlist? Panama is the only potential retirement destination we have visited, but we have a goal of checking out a new country in 2011...just having a hard time narrowing our focus, so looking for suggestions.
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ocs 4-62
written by jerry hilson , February 10, 2011
ref the comment by ed lesesne...we are looking for OCS class mates
for a reunion at Ft Benning. Pls contact me @ cidrejh@msn.com
or 425 347 4217 (Everett, WA)
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Valid point of view.
written by Raul Zalles , February 15, 2011
Mr. Landau’s comments are very valid but consider this; I had a very good friend who immigrated to this country many years ago because his country had too many rules, everything was organized, too many forms to fill, too many taxes to pay, too much bureaucracy, everything was already planned and thought out, clean and borring (his words). He often said he wanted the opportunity to do things without so much red tape and be more free. He disliked booking tee times to play golf three days in advance. His point is valid too; he was a Swiss immigrant who lived in Bolivia. He loved it here.
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Have it all?
written by pappy , February 16, 2011
You come across as someone complaining about wanting an economically
less expensive retirement destination but on the flip side you sound like you will accept nothing less than 5 star amenities. You "can" have it all ! You just need a couple of million to live on. Good luck
young man.. you have lots of time to make your millions first and then you don't need Panama.
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written by My Name is Panama , March 02, 2011
You sound like the ugly American wanting a 5-star resort with a 5-star restaurant and 5-star spa but wanting to pay only 1-star price...when you find the Garden of Eden, please let us Panamanians know...in the mean time, que Viva Panama!
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Why most of world has a problem with Americans
written by Joan Krawczyk , March 29, 2011
It's common practise for Amicans to expect their standard of living to service them everywhere. Some cultures will not hurry to service you because it is considered impolite - difficult concept for north Americans to embrace. Ketchup should be outlawed - it is disgusting - and there is no disgrace in cooking for yourself especially if you consider yourself a foodie. If those qualties are so important to you - go home. I found customer service in the states just as appauling and not every city has good food - try and find something not fried when doing a road trip. My personal measuring stick for Americans is if they ask for ketchup even for a Big mac
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BABOZO!
written by Nestor Yo , March 30, 2011
Interesante... Provocativo... Y valido. Sin embargo, todo es relativo. Considerando que dicha opinion fue expresada en 2010, la pregunta clave es: en que parte del mundo no hubo inflacion? Medellin? Dudo que, hasta el sol de hoy, Medellin no haya sido afectada por ella.

Imaginando que el autor de la opinion es Americano, es comun que el acto de paciencia no forma parte de su lexicono personal. Y no es que falta de paciencia sea un delito, pero se a de reconocer que generalmente el americano es muy impaciente en todo; dicha impaciencia causa intransigencia de caracter. Por otro lado, si a Panama no referimos, no hay pais latino americano (incluyendo a las Islas Virgenes de EE.UU y Bermuda) donde se pueda conseguir un plato exquisito, mucho menos un Big Mac, en menos de 20 minutos.

Es obio que el autor, ademas de estar indignado por sus experiencias fuera de los EE.UU., no ha viajado mucho y quizas trabaja para el departamento de turismo de otro pais que no es Panama o Costa Rica y esta apelando al factor ineducado y temerozo de la sociedad mundial.

Como dicen en ciertos lares del caribe - "NO SEA BABOZO"
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written by Lusitano , April 07, 2011
I must agree with Matt for the most part; Panama is not the "hot" retirement location promoters, with obvious interests, make it to be. Real estate prices have sky rocketed over the last five years, totally unsupported. Construction quality and standards are poor and the infrastructure has not kept up with the building boom. Real estate sales have dropped dramatically, yet prices are still high; the market is in major denial...
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written by wryawry , April 07, 2011
Matt, your perspective is interesting -- and telling. Your observations are obviously echoed by many of your readers; it seems a nearly universal quest for the "greener grass" is prevelant in the world today. Your appetites aside, there is something to be said for trying to simplify one's life as one closes in on the finish line ...
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written by Max , April 10, 2011
The Autor like most American like to travel abroad and compare developing countries to theirs.Panama is in the developing stages, and yes it has a long way to go when it comes to customer service and perhaps High end couture restaurants like the autor so desperately needs. On the other hand the reason for prices to be going up in Panama is because of the Americans coming here and been used to spending lots of dollars for services not rendered have created the american greed monters to surface in Panama.Retirement in Panama is not for everyone but I am sure there are many US citizens who are now retired and are living on cat food and packed in nursing homes where attention to the customer is the least of their care taker worries. So to speak of Panama as if it is the worse place to live, try living in the Bronx New York, the Mountains of Virginia and the list go on and on.Panama may not be Miami, but I can still eat a piece of Snapper with a fresh salad for under $10.00. As Bad as it may Be The Donald found it so Irresistible he had to Build a Tower Here, I wonder Why!!!!!
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written by Luis R. Morales , April 16, 2011
I have read with great interest the comments, of not wanting to retired in Panama, Im originally from Puerto Rico,U. S. Army retiree. of course i strictly depend on my S.S.and Army pension,and to see those expression only indicate that what we are confronting is another" Ugly American", im simply sorry for her, and with due respect wish her to take leave and land in another shore tha may full fill her dreams. i can say without hesistation, Panama have become my second country, at least here i feel that i can live a more dignify life, instead of being a penny pinching retiree in our almighty America! i simply love being here and their people. viva panama y su gente!!!!!
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written by Mark OBrien , April 19, 2011
All very intersting comments. I am considering retirement in Panama and plan my firt trip next month.
When you consider that no place is perfect and everyone can find some fault with any location. Do you feel this string of negative comments reflects a vocal minority or majority or retirees?
Also when you consider all the major check box's, cost of living, weather, security, diversity in geography, health care, biz opportunities etc. Does it still rise to top of most places you would consider? While I love many of the creature comforts of living in the US. You don't have to look far to see the erosion of services, higher taxes, cost living and health care and a general lack of values in this country as a whole.
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Where you come from
written by Jeff/toronto , April 20, 2011
Yes there is some truth to what he is saying, BUT the quality and taste of food in Panama, please dont even compare!!!, the food in the US is by far, one of the worst in the world.
but then again,, probably you should stay in your city and eat that greasy food youir country is so famous.
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written by Steven Miller , May 09, 2011
I appreciate all of the constructive comments. Having been on the fast track work program for the past thirty plus years, I have come to the conclusion that slowing down may be something useful to prolonging my life, and as one writer put it,"live with dignity on a fixed income". My largest concern would be in finding some way to assist in volunteering my years of experience(residential development, most all sports) to others who may appreciate it. I want to slow down, not lie down.
My wife and I will be visiting in the next couple of months and I would love to sit down and listen to others who have come to the country for similar reasons.
Any ides as to how we could achieve would be greatly appreciated.
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Try Merida, Yucatan, Mexico
written by CH40 , June 06, 2011
Merida is a beautiful city of 800,000 that is very safe and has fine services and amenities. The people are proud Mayan descendants and you are a $1 bus ride from gulf beaches. We are planning our 3rd trip and find ourselves tempted to try retirement there - actually, we would live near the beach about a 1/2 hr from the away due to the heat of the city. For the record, after attending festivals with 1000 s of people, our group agreed we all felt safer than in the states --a lovely place and reasonable for someone with a US income.
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written by Young Jim , June 08, 2011
Big Macs don't have ketchup.
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written by Safadinho , June 18, 2011
Hi from Brazil. I have lived in 13 countries and I can tell you that no one likes it when foreigners criticize their land. Which explains some of the "over the top" reactions above.

I have not lived in Panama but I hope to starting next year. It definitely has pluses and minuses, just like all other corners of the globe. Everyone's ranking of best places to live will be unique. I love tropical weather, cheap beer, nice beaches, and countries that are not overrun with huge crowds. I love Panama.

I worked at McDonalds 35 years ago. Big Macs do not have ketchup so I not understand why this because a special order.
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written by Cindy , August 02, 2011
On a recent visit to Panama I developed traveler's "distress" in part because I was not as careful as I should have been about drinking water and eating fresh produce. However, because I had a fever and was sick several days, I visited a recommended medical clinic in Panama City. There was no long wait, the staff was bilingual, the procedures and sanitation were exemplary, the doctor was courteous. I had urinanalysis, blood work and doctor consult for $35. The meds. were another $15. Medical costs in retirement can be excuriating in the USA and I would think this factor alone could tips the scales to Panama as a retirement option. Granted the lack of infrastructure was in part the reason I was ill but several folks have informed me of wonderful medical and dental care for a fraction of what insurance costs here in the USA. Any thoughts on that aspect?
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Panama for ex-Pats
written by Bertha House , August 03, 2011
My husband and I try to spend a few months each Winter in Panama. We are hoping to get away from people like Matt. The folks in Panama have been more than helpful to us, with our bad Spanish and lack of local knowledge. They are patient with us; we, therefore, are moved to be patient with them. There are some inconveniences, but we enjoy simplifying our lives and rediscovering each other without all the distractions of the U.S.A. People in general, no matter where we travel, don't have the same work ethic we were raised with. 50 years from now, they will be saying the same about the "younger generation" I'm sure. We love the fresh, affordable veggies and fruits; the more "laid back" way of life, and the warmth of the Panamanian people. Many went out of their way to help us every time we've been there. We plan to spend 4 months there this winter and, hopefully, we will manage to avoid like the plague people with Matt's attitude!
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written by judith amber , August 30, 2011
Having researched retirement places, Panama appealed to me because it allowed lower income retires to live there, which is not the case in Mexico, and because I put a high value on the natural environment. I know that Boquete and Volcan, two places I am considering, have had a recent influx of Americanns and Canadians and for me, that's a plus even though I speak spanish. I am single and will be starting life over and so a place with a highly developed network of social activities-- an electronic "newcomers club" in a way, is appealing. I need dental care I haven't been able to afford in the US and will be able to get same in David, panama's second largest city that is 1/2 hour from Boquete. Most of the comments that were negative were about Panama City. Would someone living in the Boquete area or a smaller beach town care to comment on their experience?
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written by Stewart , September 07, 2011
Hi. I've been reading the mixed reviews regarding Panama as a retirement destination. My wife and I have justed turned 60. We are looking at Panama ( 7-10 years from now) as a place to spend 4-6 months of the year. Would like to connect with knowledgable realtors about possible areas to either rent/purchase a home/apartment. We love the beach, ocean water but would like to be relatively close to the city. I'm sure there are areas that might be perfect for our lifestyle. HELP!!!

STEWART
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City life etc.
written by TDH , October 03, 2011
Judith Amber wrote: "Most of the comments that were negative were about Panama City." I think you're onto something there. Most Americans really seem to hate city life, which is a sentiment I can't embrace, as I live in the center of NYC. How does Panama City compare to New York with regard to the overall, everyday course of life?
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To whyne or wine?
written by Don Reeves , October 10, 2011
Judith:

I, among others so tastefully have written above, have lived and visited countries around the world. I have been researching for the past four years of a retirement area, and I believe have done my due diligence.

I feel I have won "impulse buyer of the year" award many years in succession. Funny thing is...I have not regretted one thing.

We travelled to Costa Rica for two months last year, then onto Panama for one month and were thoroughly enthralled with the area of Boquete. We visited Volcan and found it exciting in a "Sandspit=misty, rainy, in the shadow of the volcano Baru" kind of atmosphere, and chose not to stay but ran back to Boquete.

Yes, there are inequities, however the pluses far outweigh the minuses in my opinion. I am though, an optimist (some describe "an optimist is a poorly informed pessimist"). Seeing the good in people is in my blood.

Yes, there are more expensive homes in Boquete or in some of the outlying subdivisions. Beautiful -indeed they are! However, we chose a simple home, in a simple subdivision. One that we can put in our own character to make it our retirement villa. The majority of residents are Panamanian, with a mix of Gringos = fellow Canucks, Americans, etc. which will make for a fun mix!

We are eager to learn Spanish and yet still wish to be involved with the English speaking communities/groups that are really active in the community at large.

Boquete is only 45 min from the Pacific coast and 4.5 hrs from the Caribbean. Not too shabby! It is small, simple and quiet. PERFECT! Not being ones to live and die for the complex urban lifestyle, we are anxious to start our pensionado program soon.

Excellent real estate service, excellent legal advice. Fresh food, simple lifestyle, more than ample rainfall, decent infrastructure, excellent healthcare system, stable democracy...what we all long for...(well most of us anyway)!

Contact us if you wish any further info on Boquete or visit many of the blogs from the locals. They are most informative and helpful.

Don
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written by frank burns , November 04, 2011
Of course Big Macs don't come with catchup. Maybe you are expecting too much and a natural complainer.
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I totally agree, Panama sucks, and it is disgusting, Low-rated comment [Show]
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written by JAC , November 28, 2011
I am 50/50 with a US Father and Panamanian Mother. I was raised in Panama (Canal Zone) and moved the USA 11 years ago because my Dad convinced me and not because I needed it. I am still here and I am very thankfull for the opportunities this country have given me and my 2 teenage boys I have made friends and I have a good job. But I miss my Panama so much... I just cant wait for my younger son whom is 14 y/o to turn 18 and graduate from Highschool...So I can go back HOMe to my beautiful country with my beautiful people, where everybody knows each other..when if your child goes a few blocks down the street the neighbor from the corner will keep an eye on and protect from any danger. Where you know the names of everyone and trust most of them. Where you can ask your friend to watch your child if you have an emergency and they wont charge you and still be sure your child is safe. Where if you have no money you can take a mango from your own backyard tree or from your neighbors and wont get in trouble with the police.Where you eat not processed but healthy non processed food at a cheap price. Where you can go Fish at any river or ocean and be sure that you can cook that fresh fish and you wont get sick because it is contaminated. Where you can go swimming in most of the rivers in the country for free and see animals in their natural habitat without having to pay and entrance fee to a park.

Not like here that you live for years at a place and don't even know the name of your next door neighbor even though you see them every day. Here that if you want to take your children to see animals you better go to the ZOO and pay $15each entrance fee +you can't take your own food nor beverages. Here where you dont even eat half of what you used to eat back home and gain twicw de weigh because of al the processed food..

I been back to visit several times My Beautyful Panama... and truly don't understand why if Panama is so bad according to this gentleman that posted this note...why is it full of so many immigrants, people from countries all over the world, just like in the U.S ?..Anyone pretending to move to Panama like any other country most be willing to understand and adapt to the country and the people. I know they are customer service standards etc etc...but when you move to a different country you must adapt to it and not pretend to the ountry and the people from that country adapt to you and your standards. Panamanians likes to make everyone feel at home..anda lot of times that is misinterpret like lack o customer service or ghetto or not having good manners...panamanians are natural and they will treat you like family. But some pople don't understand that concept. If not...just ask all the Spaniards,Indians,Venezuelan,Dominicans,Italians, Colombians etc etc that have immigrated and continue immigrating to Panama why they like it so much.

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written by Beno , December 30, 2011
Having been to 47 different countries,including Panama and much of Central and South America I've come to believe that you get out of a place (such as Panama) that which you put into it. If you're looking for 5-star amenities on a budget and U.S.-style service levels, then most of Latin America or southern Europe is probably not for you. Stay in the USA and shop at the malls. However, if what you seek includes natural beauty, lower levels of stress, cuktural depth and the company of people who enjoy life rather than a homogenized, bland routine (perhaps what you term "laziness") then there is a world of life experience to be had, whether in Panama or a dozen other Latin American destinations. Taste the fruit, rather than complain about the tree.
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written by BELLA SOLANKA , January 15, 2012
I retired , and decided to move to Panama because that was my dream return to my country. Due to problems with neighbors and a bad guy I have to sell everything and return to the US. Some people has change a lot........when I was in my 20s, people used to be nice and friendly, I did see that anymore...........I love my country but I am very sad because a drug user woman everytime she walked by my fence she insulted me for no reason (there is no a law to punish this people). I was told by a the bad guy to leave my house. Never in my life I though that I have to leave my own country this way.
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DR
written by Dr Disc , January 20, 2012
After reading your comments on Panama I am sure the Panamanians are thrilled you will not be among them.
A BIG ADIOS TO YOU
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Loved this bit ....
written by Mark Clayson , February 14, 2012
Great article. Especially the following:


"Good food is an integral part of my life ..... a true foodie like myself"

and then...

"waiting twenty-five minutes for a BigMac" !
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Is Panama still a Retirement Haven?
written by Augustine St. Claire , February 23, 2012
Is Panama Still a Retirement Haven?

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7839908/is_panama_still_a_retirement_haven.html

Something to thing about. I've seen prices go up double. Cheaper in the states.
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How about an update Matt?
written by PanamaMark , April 04, 2012
Hey Matt, I really appreciate how thorough you were in your piece to point out the contradictions you feel in your comments - I feel so much the same. It's often a Love - Hate thing with me and Panama and I find that is probably the most powerful allure to this land. It constantly has me questioning my beliefs, my motives - my definitions - indeed my values. Although I disagree with some of your desires in retirement and have a 180 different perspective on some too - I really appreciate your authenticity in sharing what on your mind in in your heart. Now, I couldn't help but wonder how things have changed since you first opined this piece almost two years ago. How is Panama different in your eyes today? I look forward to your update!
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written by Howard , April 23, 2012
I spent several years in Panama in the late 70's and early 80's. I love the lure of peace there. I have been down a few times since then and it is true that some things have gone up in price, but I still love LaChorrera and Vacamonte very much. They are away from the big city yet the big city is close. If you want gourmet this and that you need to go to Europe with their failing economies and outrageous prices. Or stay in the states. I love the pace in Panama and look forward to retiring there in a few years.
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........................
written by Caralbbeit , May 02, 2012
I totally agree that costumer service in Panama is non existent but you have to understand about “cultural differences.” It is the way of living and norm of conduct that have been shape for generations. Panamanian haven’t been taught the meaning of been customer service oriented. It is so common that local people would not mind because they are so used to. As a Panamanian living in the US fro the last 14 years, I could tell you that. For instance, when I came here I started to working as a waiter and some time I would tell my costumer I was busy or that the restaurant was full of people so I could not get to them as soon as they wanted. They would stare at me in surprise and I did not understand that. Later on, I learned and understood that telling excuses such as those were rude and impolite even if they were true. I grow up with the idea that saying things like those were normal things to do.

You also talk about laziness and Rudeness but I have found same situation here. I believe that during your generations; the 50’s, 60’s 70’s and maybe 80’s you could find hardworking Americans but the young American generation is just as lazy and rude as in any other part of the word. I have found my self to have to work double just because Americans don’t want to their job. And only, when they see me upset the come and ask me in Spanish “necesita ayuda” do you need help. So why do you think that employers like to hire Hispanics to do labor jobs and work in restaurant. It is because the young American generation does not want to do it.

I and many Hispanic people don’t also find American food to be good but tasteless and greasy nor good amenities here. In my latest 30”s, I have found my self sometimes bored to death with nothing to do other that go to Wal-Mart and the mall to clear my mind. I miss going to warm beaches, clear rivers to swim, enjoying carnivals, patriotic celebrations fairs, gathering with warm people and a bunch of other celebration that Panama has. You think only for your self and that the world turns around you whit your 5 start expectations. I do understand that we have cultural differences and I have accepted those many years ago.
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written by tomZ , May 10, 2012
All very interesting.............
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Mi admiracion para todas las opiniones
written by Lucy Cardenas , May 15, 2012
Soy panamena y he vivido en los Estados Unidos por 22 anos. La verdad lo dicho por el autor de este articulo no esta muy lejos de la realidad. Puedo decir que es verdad de la mayoria de los que opinaron que la generacion de hoy en dia en cualquier pais es muy distinta a la de los 60's, 70's 80's en la cual eran mas orientados al trabajo duro y a pesar de que los pamnamenos tenemos un caracter fuerte siempre hemos sido muy serviciales, especialmente cuando se trataba de extranjeros. Talvez se perdio en alguna parte de generacion en generacion la importancia del buen servicio y el respeto. Yo solo he visitado mi pais unas 15 veces en estos anos, pero me sigue gustando su comida tan deliciosa, como no he probado en ninguna otra parte, su gente con su personalidad autentica neta panamena, su entusiasmo por la vida y la verdad no puedo esperar a que mis hijos acaben de crecer para regresar a vivir a mi bello Panama. Admiro la ecuanimidad de todos los opinionadores al plasmar sus puntos de vistas de manera muy respetuosa. Significa que en general seamos panamenos, norte americanos , puertorriquenos, mexicanos o de cualquier otro pais podemos lograr vivir en armonia una vez encontremos el lugar sonado para vivir. Panama para mi es lo maximo, lo tiene todo. En todas partes del mundo hay bueno y malo y en todas partes del mundo hay servivio al consumidor pesimo. Aqui lo vivo mas y mas cada dia y yo aun vivo en Estados Unidos.
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written by Sah , June 06, 2012
I was thought to accept another person point of view no matter if it was good, wrong or indifferent.I have dual citizenship my dad american and my mom panamanian (I' a medical doctor). Spent years in both places Actually living in St Louis, Mo. Matt ( author) mentioned a few things that are so true. e.g., the rising cost of life. Our currency is the US dollar ( no suprise why things are so expensive). Work ethics: You have lazy people here in the US too (there is a difference with the 60-80's generation) were a little bit more focused. Customer service here is as terrible as in Panama and the reason is because companie's lack of cultural accountability. The difference I paid here 5 times the same amount for a service as bad as there. Food: That Panama lack in good food ( where had you been eating while in Panama?) We have a cultural mixed (excellent Spanish food, worldwide cuisine) it just depend where have you been and how much you want to pay. I have been in several states and friends suggested some restaurants ( nothing I can rate with at least a 7, but we love a steak house here amazing steaks and salad ( but over 100 a plate). McDonald's? seriously... and good food is an integral part in your life ( I cannot have McD's everytime I tried get sick).. that was a joke right?. I understand you don't want or see Panama as place for your retirement ( we cannot be a golden cup for everyone), but we have to be fair with our comments. The health care system in here in US is bad, and expensive ( people will continue to fill bankrupt for medical issues (but not in Panama).
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written by Paul Schuster , June 22, 2012
,"I want to surround myself in some part of the world with prompt and hard working individuals, traits which simply are not engrained in Panamanian culture. Not only is it difficult to get things done relying on a lazy person, but the laziness has a tendency of seeping into you via Panamanian osmosis. I want to get sharper over my retirement years, not more dull"

This points out the difference between a Latin American culture and an American one. Your correct at first, but then you try to call the other culture lazy people just because they have a different outlook on life.

Your condescending attitude is why you are one of the Ugly Americans.
I am sure you have to be a Republican.. Your comments are what a Republican would say.

In the U.S. we live to work, in Latin America they work to live.
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Panama is Beautiful!!!!!!!
written by ALINA , June 22, 2012
I love Panama and I think is very Pretty...... bla bla bla....
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written by Karla , June 28, 2012
Why are u still in Panama then??? go back to your country where everything is perfect smilies/smiley.gif SIMPLE!!
I think people love to complain about everything. There is always better than here....I know that the costumer service is not the best, but you also said that the prices are going up, so how do u expect to get the best service when you dont want to spend "too much"?? Panama is way cheaper than USA or Canada and the service my dear kind of the same....
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written by maya , June 29, 2012
I visited Panama last year and found a lot of the authors comments to be true. What he didn't say was that I met some on the warmest, intelligent and "real" people I have ever met. I might not want to move there to retire, but I would love to visit again and again.
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Construction juega vivo in Panama
written by Rick Ettinger , June 30, 2012
I live in Las Tablas and am doing improvements on a house I purchased not long ago. It is a learning experience to say the least. My wife has been helping me as much as possible since she speaks Spanish. But, here are some of the lessons I have learned:

Panamanians do not pay attention to detail ever. Getting paid is important. Once a Panamanian is paid then any unfinished work will not be completed. Before he gets paid, work will be done, but never will he pay any attention to detail. A Panamanian must be observed at all times while he is working. When you quit looking, he will quit working. But, if you are not experienced you will not know if he is milking the job or not. Panamanians are sloppy workers. They don't ever clean up after themselves. Panamanians will not have their own tools(maybe a machete). Panamanians will never say no. Panamanians are never on time. Work will never be done when they say they will do it. It is also OK for them to quote a price and then not finish the job and then ask for more money. If you refuse, then they will just get angry with you, call you names and then they will leave. They will then come back in their cars, driving by to see if work has resumed. Customer satisfaction is not important. Repeat business is not important. Having a good reputation is not important. Getting paid a lot of money for doing a little work is the goal. Everything is cheap to a Panamanian. Including what he charges you for a job. If you are not satisfied with the work, the response will be, well, you should have paid me more. Panamanians are always right also and will never admit to making a mistake, ever.

When you are dealing with a Panamanian contractor you cannot take anything for granted or assume anything. That will always bite you in the ass. But, Murphy's law will find a way into the mix anyway just to frustrate you and drive you to the brink of insanity. If I was offered one guy from Mexico or a bus load of Panamanians, there would be just one guy working for me, and more work would be done at the end of the day.

The work will be finished in the next few weeks I am sure.
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WHAT AN IDIOT
written by Marie France , July 15, 2012
The comment of this person MATT made me laugh. Americans in Panama I thought, tell me about it. Not only do they come as shoe string retirees (they can barely make it in the States) if they don't get the price they are aiming for the other party is the bad guy. The reason that there are so many American retirees wanting to come to Panama is the fault of the investors. The Panamanian law for retirees was diverted into a marketing pitch.
"Come to Panama where you can live with 600usd per month!"
That law was voted for Panamanians, who for the majority do not have a big pension or nothing at all. They get 25% off in certain restaurant, on electricity, on flight tickets etc. and they are gratefull. Americans retirees profit from that and have a big mouth when they do not get a discount.
Let me ask you something Americans who think like this Matt person.
What do you get in the States? Good service? Unless you pay for it right? Do you have enough money to affort a maid? No doubt NO.
The true reason for people to complain of people being lazy, not giving service is that they think they are already overpaying these people. It is the same simple minded post colonial attitude that makes these remarks. A maid should not be paid more than 200usd a month right? Try and work for the same amount and live on that salary for one month.
So what I would like to say to these "American observers", who already "shaped" this country in their time into what it is nowadays and left a non cultural heritage: The MacDo culture.
So Americans that think the same way as this Matt person, who complains about the ketchup lacking on his burger, do not come to Panama ! Panamanians do not need Americans who think their shit is icecream!! Stay in your bland sleep cities like Phoenix, with your fantastic "fast food culture around the corner." Where you do not even have a decent medical help for everybody. Don't think the rest of the world is waiting to be educated by you...


Since this Matt persons reference on food is a hamburger without ketchupsmilies/grin.gifsmilies/grin.gifsmilies/grin.gif
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I think that I'd like to retire near my family but...
written by Paco , July 21, 2012
Long ago, I lived in Panama for three years. I remember customer service in the stores as being good. The pace in restaurants was very slow. Perhaps, as my hosts would tell me, because eating is seen as a relaxing experience and to rush a diner would be very rude and a good reason for the customer to never return. The kindness of Panamenos (once you convinced them that you weren't just another gringo sucio) and the colorful expat community left me with many fond memories. I wish I had gotten to know both groups better.
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3rd world culture
written by Mikey48 , August 08, 2012
Hi Matt,
Sorry to hear that Panama isn't the paradise that it's been advertised to be. I have been living in the Philippines for a year now and can't wait to get back to the USA! The slowness you experience there is probably worse here. And the lack of adequate medical service is scary. There is very little government control of eating places, for the most part, but I'll bet American food chains are examined and found lacking enough to require an instant fine. Altogether foreigners are not liked or wanted unless they are supporting a spouse's lazy family. So, I sorry to hear about Panama. I was hoping to find another haven in case life gets too complicated back home. Colombia, huh? How's the safety in Panama? Here we are targeted. Guess I'll have to keep looking.

Mike
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It's best to do your homework before you retire anywhere!
written by Elizabeth Vance , October 27, 2012
I always find it interesting how Panama has been misrepresented to be a retirement destination that has it all. Matt's article is now close to three years old, and happily some things have changed. But others have not. I'd encourage anyone considering moving to Panama or retiring to Panama to read ALL of the comments above, and then to download my new book on Amazon, which has just been released. It's The Gringo Guide to Panama; What to Know Before You Go. It will share a lot more details of what on the Isthmus is like today, whether you are seeking retirement or just a different life.

I am a huge proponent, like Matt, of presenting Panama for what it IS, even if that means helping people understand what is it NOT and what it may not offer them. Good luck everyone!
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written by Mary Lou , December 04, 2012
So far, i haven't heard anything legitimate to keep me from moving to Panama. The weather alone is a plus for me. All the complaints about service and food or whatever, I have experienced here in Canada....So having said that, no one here has convinced me this is a bad place to live. Thank you for your comments...it has been very helpful. .............
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written by Deyka Colello , January 07, 2013
Encuentro el articulo refrescante. Pienso que ademas de ser adaptable es importante conocerse a uno mismo. Es una lastima que halla personas que no tengan el elemento de ser "resourcefuls" si la comida no te parece bien entonces a el menos tienes la gran ventaja que si no quiere cocinar puede tener una empleada/cocinera y enseñarle como quiere sus comidas. Que si no hay gente interesante, quizás no se dedico actividades interesantes el mismo para atraer a ese tipo de personas. O sea, hay cosas en una cultura q no se pueden cambiar pero creo que uno tiene la capacidad de crear su nicho. llevo viviendo en USA 15 yrs, y toma tiempo rodearse de gente afines, de conocer cual restaurante es bueno etc. como en todas partes. Entretenimiento y ciudad cosmopolita? eso no es problema si quiere Cirque du Soleil. con todo lo que uno se ahorra en Panama puede tomar un avión a cualquier destino y pasar unas vacaciones culturales. Pero para entretenimiento hay gente dispuesta a pasar un rato agradable fiesteando en tu propia casa smilies/smiley.gif A el principio toma tiempo adaptarse a todo, pero una vez q uno tenga su hogar organizado es cuestión de uno hacer lo mas de lo que hay. Conociendo a uno mismo. Lo que tiene Panama es calor humano, eso es lo mas grande. No hay nada en este articulo que mire el aspecto mas profundo de el ser humano, ni siquiera menciona el factor salud q es tan decisivo para un retirado. En Panama uno puede pagarse una enfermera y son de las mejores de el mundo. Por algo Panama es con Paraguay el primer lugar en el mundo donde la gente es mas feliz. Uno podra comer todo lo gourmet que quiera, ir a actividades culturales etc " y sentirse solo e ignorado. A este articulo le falto..la profunda sabiduria que otorgan los años.
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President
written by Art Martin , January 24, 2013
Having traveled globally for years and now looking for a pleasant economical place to land my choices would be Thailand or Phiippines. Manila isdefinitey off the list but Bacolod is ideal. In Thailand I would stay out of Bangkokand opt for perhaps Hua Hin. Chaing Mai is always touted as the place to be and if you prefer an inland region it is but as far as coastal Hua Hin has it all beat. I investigated Panama, visited, stayed a bit and looked around. Housing prics are an issue. Service is an issue if you need anything done. I think Americans are wowed with South and Cental America because of proximity but you have to look beyond that. Malaysia is always brought up on lists of places but havig worked and lived there off and on since 1993 I'd scratch it off the list. There isn't enough space here to list the issues there.
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heaven
written by Mikenatera , July 04, 2013
smilies/cool.gifpanama.....leave it or love it!!
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I'm very excited
written by t9chi , July 29, 2013
I'm very excited about seeing the country. Have never been there but I feel that I would be happy there. Looking to visit in June/July 2013
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Panama Isn't For A Lot of People
written by Panamania , November 02, 2013
I had been looking at moving there, but after reading so many bad things about it, I will definitely not. Some people seem to have good experiences, but it seems like there are certain pervasive culture differences (both laziness and juego vivo) that are problematic, to say the least. I was reading this woman's story about needing to leave the country http://pleasehelpmemove.blogspot.com/ and about how there's fecal matter in the water. Wow.
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... and are you still thinking of moving to Panama?
written by Keila Mulero , January 22, 2014
Are you interested in moving to Panama? We can help you!

My name is Keila Mulero, permanent resident of Panama and US citizen. During my 15 years career in Corporate America I was expatriated to the US, Peru and the Dominican Republic. With the world economic situation, I found Panama as “the land of opportunities” and decided to move and start up Savvy Link to provide solutions to expatriates, investors, and retirees.

At Savvy Link our goal is to stream line the migration process, investments and establishment of a business or companies in Panama. My colleagues and I have experienced the whole process ourselves. We have learned the Panamanian “system” and requirements. Our partnership with a local law firm, has allowed us to develop and design a process to help individuals and corporations when doing business in Panama.

We would like an opportunity to introduce ourselves and explore how can we be a resource to your company or business. Visit our website www.savvylink.net for more information about our services, our people, affiliates and much more. You can also send us an email at info@savvylink.net. Or, just give us a call at 011-507-6550-9580 or 011-507-6948-4929 in Panama or 1-317-760-1343 in US. We are fully bilingual in ENGLISH and SPANISH.

Thanks in advance,

Keila Mulero – Savvy Link your savvy connection to Panama!
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So true
written by JCenFrance , June 18, 2014
I lived in Panama for 12 years after California. What you said is true>> lazy bad service even cheaters
But I moved far from the big city in a village near the Pacific and
I loved it.. but my job moved to France... you talk about a change
the food was 4 times more but I love it here
JC
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...
written by jeff hauser , October 28, 2014
I ha ve lived here for 5 yrs now and it is the worst mistake of my life-Uneducated and backwards w no morals. It is easy to see why everything is so run down and broken-they dont care -DO NOT MOVE HERE!!!. Crme is out of control and drivers deaths equal all of USA
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Last Updated on Tuesday, 11 May 2010 00:43
 
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